Sixten Sason in wonderland's avatar

Sixten Sason in wonderland

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Sixten Sasons a-perspectival trips into the world of architecture, mother of all arts.
Versuche zur Überwindung der 08/15-copy/paste-Bildkultur.
A constantly evolving digital library.
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"(...) there’s a hell of a good universe next door; let’s go"
e.e. cummings
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Meanwhile, that universe out there can wait. Finding perfect balance in a kind of 'concept of normality' and a search for the qualities of everyday life are worthy & sensible. Far away from the fake monstrous weirdness, some people tend to create. You may call that boring. I don't (mind).
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Theme by Theme Static

Jo Janssen Architecten, WVD house, Maastricht (NL), 2001–03.

"The house consists of two volumes, of which the head volume is divided into three different levels; one level for the children, one habitable level and one level reserved for the parents. The second volume contains both the kitchen and the basement.
By using a splitlevel organisation, all three levels flow over, causing the children’s floor to be halfly submerged and the habitable floor to be lifted up halfly, to advance the privacy of the habitants. Next to the masterbedroom, which is oriented on the east, the parent’s floor offers a study, connected to the hall and providing a view over the Belgian border. The children’s floor counts two individual stairs, one connecting to the hall, one connecting to the kitchen, offering the children a choice of which route they’ll take. In contrary to the back facade, which offers big open windows and thereby connect the building to the garden, the windows on the front facade are made of reglit to create a distance between the habitants and thepassenger. However, all windows are chosen both to inhale daylight and offer view.”